21st Century Fine Dining in a medieval space

The restaurant is the oldest part of Hipping, dating back to the 15th century, though we doff a cap to the buildings past we haven’t let time stand still… the walls are painted with pigments exclusively created by local artists’ Pip Seymour and Rebecca Wallace; making use of minerals from within 15 miles of Hipping, including Gritstone from Ingleton, Rudstone from the Lune Valley and Backbarrow Blue from Backbarrow. The drapes framing the windows are hand crafted from Yorkshire wools by Pennine Tweed and the ironwork from which they hang have been lovingly crafted by Albion Ironwork, Lancaster. The staff wear contemporary yet utilitarian aprons marking the properties past as a Smithy. Even the plates and bowls used to showcase Oli’s food have been cleverly conceived by artisan potters Miles-Moore Ceramics (Martin & Siobhan) using materials and glazes made from local minerals, including pink granite from Shap, slate from Coniston, haematite from Egremont, river sand from the Wenning in Yorkshire and Lune in Cumbria and Lancashire to reflect both Oli’s connection with the landscape and the restaurant’s continuing evolution…

By using the natural resources to hand in this amazing landscape in which we find ourselves we have attempted to convey through the texture, shape, colour, and materials Hipping’s true sense of place within the context of its surroundings…

The Lune Valley, the Pennine Moors, The Forest of Bowland and the distant Lakeland fells are all reflected in some small part in this intimate space…

We have sought to create at Hipping Hall a true terroir of England’s North Country – to link the dining experience to the landscape, to create a sense of all that it means to be immersed in this place…